If you've driven by Senor Lucky's Mexican restaurant in Davison in the past couple of days, you probably noticed an empty parking lot. Well, that's because they've closed their doors...but hopefully, not for good.

I drove by Senor Lucky's earlier this week and notice there wasn't a single car in the parking lot. Not going to lie, that got me worried a little bit. If I can't get their amazing Mexican pizza at least once a month, I might just freak out.

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I couldn't find any information on their Facebook page as to why they were closed. I kept digging around but found nothing, until someone posted on the Davison Community group page on Facebook.

A woman from the community was asking the very same question as me:

Does anyone know what happened to Senor Luckys? Will it be reopening?

Multiple people on Davison Community page commented on what they believed had happened.

What Happened?

Apparently, there was some sort of a fire a few days ago, possibly electrical. After one person on the page made the fire comment, others chimed in confirming that it was indeed a fire that caused Senor Lucky's to close their doors.

I have no clue as to how much damage the restaurant suffered but one person on the group page sounded confident with their comment stating that "they will be okay and back on their feet soon."

So there you have it, mystery solved (sort of).

Hopefully, they'll be able to bounce back and reopen in the coming weeks (or days).

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